Episode I of Austen’s Mysterious Death: Sleuth Kirstin Leaves No Stone Unturned. Except the Really Big Ones that are Hard to Turn Over, by Kirstin Odegaard

Episode I of Austen’s Mysterious Death: Sleuth Kirstin Leaves No Stone Unturned. Except the Really Big Ones that are Hard to Turn Over, by Kirstin Odegaard

Today, I’d like to write about the most Googled question on the internet: how Jane Austen died. Oh.  Sorry for that anticlimax if you were expecting a different question.  No, the hot duke is not returning to Bridgerton, ever.  We’re all just going to have to content ourselves with the equally angst-ridden viscount. Now back… Read the full blog post …

Bleeding a Patient to Cure Apoplexy in the Regency Era, by Regina Jeffers

Bleeding a Patient to Cure Apoplexy in the Regency Era, by Regina Jeffers

In Regency novels, the reader frequently reads of one of the characters suffering an apoplexy. Exactly, what does that mean? Apoplexy (from the Ancient Greek, meaning “a striking away”) is bleeding within internal organs and the accompanying symptoms. For example, ovarian apoplexy is bleeding in the ovaries. The term, especially as it was used in… Read the full blog post …

Mazal Tov! Celebrating a Jewish Regency Romance novel, by Mirta Ines Trupp

Mazal Tov! Celebrating a Jewish Regency Romance novel, by Mirta Ines Trupp

Welcome June and mazal tov to all! In case you’re not familiar with this Hebrew term, mazal tov can be used to say “Congratulations” or “Best Wishes,” but it has other—esoteric—meanings as well. The word mazal means “drip from above” and it relates to the zodiac signs which are called mazalot. In Jewish tradition, the… Read the full blog post …