Chapter 1 of Pride and Prejudice

Chapter 1 of Pride and Prejudice

I had begun to reread Pride and Prejudice recently when it struck me just how impressive the first chapter is. At less than 1,000 words, you would expect it to be a mere toe-dip in the ocean of the novel, but it is actually quite masterful. Take that masterful first line: “It is a truth universally… more goodness …

I Did It!

I Did It!

I suppose I should be telling you about my next book, but there are several things up in the air at the moment (most importantly the cover and the release date), so instead, I’m going to talk about my birthday present. Anyone who follows me on Facebook already knows about this, but I’m still tickled and… more goodness …

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

Let’s talk about talking. Not just any kind of talking but talking in Jane Austen’s novels to be precise. There are numerous ways authors use dialogue. The most obvious way is to drive the plot forward. Darcy’s overheard insult to Elizabeth at the Assembly Ball in Pride and Prejudice is an easy example of this.… more goodness …

When Bad Things Come in Pairs: Siblings Who Wreaked Havoc in Austen’s Novels

When Bad Things Come in Pairs: Siblings Who Wreaked Havoc in Austen’s Novels

When Bad Things Come in Pairs: siblings who wreaked havoc in Austen’s novels “Prepare for trouble. And make it double!”  While fans of the Pokemon cartoon show might associate this famous line with Team Rocket’s most inept members Jessie and James, this line could easily apply to several of the sibling pairs in Austen’s novels. … more goodness …

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

“Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too far off! I could not bear to have her ten miles from me; and as for Pulvis Lodge, the attics are dreadful.” —Mrs. Bennet, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50… more goodness …

Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels

Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels

Although (just like servants) they are often little remarked upon, dogs are everywhere in Jane Austen’s novels. In the Regency, dogs were an essential feature of countryside living: we might as well imagine their incessant barking in the background when we read Austen’s stories, particularly during hunting season or when the men head outside. Most… more goodness …

ANNOUNCING THE WINNERS OF AUSTEN AUTHORS’ SPRING QUARTER GIVEAWAY

ANNOUNCING THE WINNERS OF AUSTEN AUTHORS’ SPRING QUARTER GIVEAWAY

The Austen Authors are pleased to announce the winners for the Winter Quarterly Giveaway. Congratulations!!!! If your name appears below: (1) contact Regina Jeffers (Giveaway Coordinator) at reginalm@rjeffers.com to claim your prize. READ THROUGH ALL THE NAMES FOR THERE ARE MANY WINNERS!!! Winners names are in RED.  (2) If your prize is an eBook, make certain the email address for the prize… more goodness …

“You Are Quite Sure That Is the Way of Taking an Oath in China?” by Guest Author Lona Manning

“You Are Quite Sure That Is the Way of Taking an Oath in China?” by Guest Author Lona Manning

Please join us in welcoming wonderful Austenesque author Lona Manning to the blog. Lona discovered a fascinating bit of Old Bailey courtroom drama and requested sharing the case with our fabulous Austen Authors readers. Thanks so much, Lona! This is Lona’s fourth time as a guest, the links to her previous three blogs listed below.… more goodness …

The Importance of Being Charlotte

The Importance of Being Charlotte

I think Charlotte Lucas is underrated. Do you agree? Readers of Pride and Prejudice tend to overlook Charlotte as a minor character who serves little purpose but in my opinion this is a mistake. Charlotte is a strong character in her own right, and she also serves as a warning and as a plot device.… more goodness …