Category Archives: Writing & Publishing

Greetings Our Newest Author, Christine Combe

Greetings Our Newest Author, Christine Combe

Hello! It’s me, Christine Combe, and I am a new member here at Austen Authors. I’m really honored to have been asked to join this amazing group of writers who love Austenesque literature. A little bit about me… Christine Combe is not my real name, but a pseudonym. I created it with the intention of… more goodness …

The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Plots

The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Plots

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in this view, much more dependant on the conduct of daughters than of sons; and one… more goodness …

Women and Music in the Early 19th Century

Women and Music in the Early 19th Century

As is typical, I approached my blogging day with no idea what topic to discuss. Then I read Riana Everly’s excellent blog on Classical music and Beethoven from a few days ago. If you missed it, scroll down a bit on the Home page, or click this link: Historical Tidbits: A Heroic Symphony. Now, I… more goodness …

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

Let’s talk about talking. Not just any kind of talking but talking in Jane Austen’s novels to be precise. There are numerous ways authors use dialogue. The most obvious way is to drive the plot forward. Darcy’s overheard insult to Elizabeth at the Assembly Ball in Pride and Prejudice is an easy example of this.… more goodness …

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

“Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too far off! I could not bear to have her ten miles from me; and as for Pulvis Lodge, the attics are dreadful.” —Mrs. Bennet, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50… more goodness …

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

In reviewing Pride & Prejudice, one thing stands out to me. Why wasn’t Elizabeth Bennet referred to, or thought of, as a bluestocking? She was, after all, an educated woman, although her education was a result of her own thirst for knowledge, and not because of any schooling, which would have been, in accordance with… more goodness …

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

While watching a video clip from The Devil Wears Prada the other day, I was struck with how powerfully the clothing of the characters provides visual insights into both the nature of the people and the internal arc of the protagonist, Andy. Having studied so many Austen adaptations over the past few years, I began… more goodness …

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

From Mayflower History: BIRTH:  Perhaps around 1602, likely either at Dorking or Guildford, co. Surrey, England, daughter of William Mullins. MARRIAGE:  John Alden, about 1622 or 1623, at Plymouth. CHILDREN: Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Priscilla, Jonathan, Sarah, Ruth, Mary, Rebecca, and David. DEATH:  Sometime between 1651 and 1687 at Duxbury.  By tradition she attended the funeral of Josiah Winslow in 1680,… more goodness …