Category Archives: Regency

The Exciting Topic of Perspiration

The Exciting Topic of Perspiration

Last October, a pet joined my family, which means I have been learning to cohabitate with another species. Now, I did my research before bringing the fluff-ball home. But reading about something differs from experiencing it. For example, when they mentioned shedding, I imagined a few dozen hairs escaping her daily brushing. I did not expect that, should… more goodness …

The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Plots

The Importance of Brothers in Jane Austen’s Plots

In James Fordyce’s Sermons to Young Women (1766), Fordyce says, “The world, I know not how, overlooks in our sex a thousand irregularities, which it never forgives in yours; so that the honour and peace of a family are, in this view, much more dependant on the conduct of daughters than of sons; and one… more goodness …

Women and Music in the Early 19th Century

Women and Music in the Early 19th Century

As is typical, I approached my blogging day with no idea what topic to discuss. Then I read Riana Everly’s excellent blog on Classical music and Beethoven from a few days ago. If you missed it, scroll down a bit on the Home page, or click this link: Historical Tidbits: A Heroic Symphony. Now, I… more goodness …

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

“Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too far off! I could not bear to have her ten miles from me; and as for Pulvis Lodge, the attics are dreadful.” —Mrs. Bennet, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50… more goodness …

Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels

Dogs in Jane Austen’s Novels

Although (just like servants) they are often little remarked upon, dogs are everywhere in Jane Austen’s novels. In the Regency, dogs were an essential feature of countryside living: we might as well imagine their incessant barking in the background when we read Austen’s stories, particularly during hunting season or when the men head outside. Most… more goodness …

Banking and Bank Notes in Georgian England

Banking and Bank Notes in Georgian England

The 18th Century saw the roots of modern day banking in England. International trade and the various wars, most importantly, the war with France, led to the development of the British banking system. Checks and banknotes appeared, as well as the founding of the Bank of England.  Before banks, many of the services we think… more goodness …

Celestial Persuasion~ A Jewish Austen Fan Fiction

Celestial Persuasion~ A Jewish Austen Fan Fiction

A few weeks ago, I wrote about my Work in Progress: Celestial Persuasion. If you missed the original post, you can read it here: https://mirtainestruppauthor.com/2021/02/19/the-viceroyalty-of-rio-de-la-plata-a-peek-into-a-new-jewish-austen-fan-fiction/ I’m getting closer to Publishing Day and I can’t wait to share it with you. In the mean time, please take a minute to watch this short trailer. The painting of… more goodness …

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

In reviewing Pride & Prejudice, one thing stands out to me. Why wasn’t Elizabeth Bennet referred to, or thought of, as a bluestocking? She was, after all, an educated woman, although her education was a result of her own thirst for knowledge, and not because of any schooling, which would have been, in accordance with… more goodness …

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

While watching a video clip from The Devil Wears Prada the other day, I was struck with how powerfully the clothing of the characters provides visual insights into both the nature of the people and the internal arc of the protagonist, Andy. Having studied so many Austen adaptations over the past few years, I began… more goodness …

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