Category Archives: Literary References

12 Rules for Life: Dos and Don’ts from Austen’s Novels

12 Rules for Life: Dos and Don’ts from Austen’s Novels

Austen’s pen was a fountain of wisdom full of insights on behavior told in her particular brand of satirical wit. Each tale includes cautionary revelations on character flaws and features the types of mistakes we humans make in the course of navigating life, love, and relationships. Today we’re going to extract twelve rules – a… more goodness …

Frances “Fanny” Austen and the Character of Mrs. Croft in Jane Austen’s “Persuasion”

Frances “Fanny” Austen and the Character of Mrs. Croft in Jane Austen’s “Persuasion”

Before discussing Fanny Austen, we must, first, establish the lady’s relationship to the author Jane Austen by mentioning the lady’s husband, Rear Admiral Charles John Austen (23 June 1778 – 7 October 1852), who was the sixth and youngest son of the Reverend George Austen. Like his elder brother, Sir Francis Austen, Charles joined the… more goodness …

My House is Me and I Am It

My House is Me and I Am It

My kids have a great picture book called, “The Big Orange Splot” that I took this title from because it fits so well the intimacy that homes and houses represent in Jane Austen’s books. There’s Lizzy running into Darcy at Pemberley, arguably the best scene in any of the movies! Mr. Knightley walking into Emma’s house… more goodness …

Writing (or Reading) a Series vs. a Standalone Novel

Writing (or Reading) a Series vs. a Standalone Novel

Isn’t it strange how our familiar surroundings and belongs fade into the background so that over time we hardly notice them? Not too long ago I was cleaning the cobwebs off of my multiple book shelves, and as I was vacuuming the layers of dust I looked closely at my extensive collection of paperbacks. As… more goodness …

Peerage, Abdication, Inheritance and Questions of Legality

Peerage, Abdication, Inheritance and Questions of Legality

When reading historical fiction/historical romance the issue of the title the gentleman holds often comes into play. There are many misconceptions, and I admit for those of us in the States, the concept can be a bit confusing. First thing a reader must know is that not all titles are created equal. For example, a baronet… more goodness …

Georgette Heyer, Queen of the Regency Genre

Georgette Heyer, Queen of the Regency Genre

Over the years I’ve heard Georgette Heyer’s name come up in lots of different places, usually in a highly complimentary way: “This story is so good, it reminds me of one of Georgette Heyer’s!” Or, “This sounds like a plot in a Georgette Heyer novel!” It was always assumed that I knew exactly who Georgette… more goodness …

Celebrating the Upcoming Release of “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + Excerpt + Giveaway

Celebrating the Upcoming Release of “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + Excerpt + Giveaway

My story, “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst,” is part of the Regency anthology, Secrets and Soirees, being released 1 July 2020. The story is heavily influenced by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “The Courtship of Miles Standish.” Many of the characters names, for example, derive from the poem. However, in Longfellow’s narrative, John Alden speaks to Priscilla… more goodness …

Top 10 Goofs in Mansfield Park (2007)

Top 10 Goofs in Mansfield Park (2007)

Prior to writing this post, I had only watched this version of Mansfield Park one time, about a decade ago on my local public television station.  Frankly, I haven’t felt compelled to revisit it up to now. With the vague recollection that I hadn’t been particularly impressed, I dove in, trying to keep an open… more goodness …

Celebrating the Release of “Courting Lord Whitmire” + the Coldstream Toll House + a Giveaway

Celebrating the Release of “Courting Lord Whitmire” + the Coldstream Toll House + a Giveaway

In many tales of the Regency era, we hear of a couple racing to Gretna Green in Scotland to marry before being caught by the lady’s relations. At the time, marrying in Scotland was as simple as standing up before witnesses and sharing one’s desire to be wed to one’s significant other. No calling of… more goodness …

Social Class in Jane Austen’s “Emma”

Social Class in Jane Austen’s “Emma”

On February 21, 2020, we will have the pleasure (at least, I hope it is pleasure) of a new movie version of Jane Austen’s “Emma.” I thought we might look back at the plot structure of Austen’s tale, especially as it has to do with social class. After call, as Cher says in “Clueless,” the… more goodness …

Loving Mr. Bennet

Loving Mr. Bennet

I’ve always liked Mr. Bennet as a character in Pride and Prejudice. He’s sarcastic and funny, he provides several priceless moments, and is Elizabeth’s true supporter, sometimes in direct confrontation with his wife. I am well aware that in looking after her daughters’ needs (i.e. wishing to see them married) Mrs. Bennet feels like she… more goodness …