Category Archives: Literary References

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

The Genius of Austen’s Dialogue: What We Learn from What They Say

Let’s talk about talking. Not just any kind of talking but talking in Jane Austen’s novels to be precise. There are numerous ways authors use dialogue. The most obvious way is to drive the plot forward. Darcy’s overheard insult to Elizabeth at the Assembly Ball in Pride and Prejudice is an easy example of this.… more goodness …

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

Pulvis Lodge, I Presume?

“Haye Park might do,” said she, “if the Gouldings could quit it—or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too far off! I could not bear to have her ten miles from me; and as for Pulvis Lodge, the attics are dreadful.” —Mrs. Bennet, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50… more goodness …

Banking and Bank Notes in Georgian England

Banking and Bank Notes in Georgian England

The 18th Century saw the roots of modern day banking in England. International trade and the various wars, most importantly, the war with France, led to the development of the British banking system. Checks and banknotes appeared, as well as the founding of the Bank of England.  Before banks, many of the services we think… more goodness …

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

The Slit in Lydia’s Gown

While watching a video clip from The Devil Wears Prada the other day, I was struck with how powerfully the clothing of the characters provides visual insights into both the nature of the people and the internal arc of the protagonist, Andy. Having studied so many Austen adaptations over the past few years, I began… more goodness …

Of Property Ownership and Inheritance

Of Property Ownership and Inheritance

This month I wanted to discuss a few things relating to property ownership and all that entails (pun intended—sort of . . .) The ownership of property was a large part of what made a Regency man a gentleman. The second aspect of attaining gentleman status was having tenants who farmed the land in the… more goodness …

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

From Mayflower History: BIRTH:  Perhaps around 1602, likely either at Dorking or Guildford, co. Surrey, England, daughter of William Mullins. MARRIAGE:  John Alden, about 1622 or 1623, at Plymouth. CHILDREN: Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Priscilla, Jonathan, Sarah, Ruth, Mary, Rebecca, and David. DEATH:  Sometime between 1651 and 1687 at Duxbury.  By tradition she attended the funeral of Josiah Winslow in 1680,… more goodness …

Cozing Up to an Austen-Inspired Mystery with the ReRelease “The Phantom of Pemberley” + a Giveaway

Cozing Up to an Austen-Inspired Mystery with the ReRelease “The Phantom of Pemberley” + a Giveaway

The Phantom of Pemberley: A Pride and Prejudice Mystery was my sixth Jane Austen book. It was originally released in 2010 by Ulysses Press. As Ulysses no longer publishes fiction stories, I had my rights to the book returned to me. I am re-releasing it to a new audience of Austen fans with a new… more goodness …

Let’s Take a Look at Mr. Bingley

Let’s Take a Look at Mr. Bingley

I’ve been thinking a bit of Mr. Bingley lately. When I finished my surgery and the recovery time after, I spent quite a bit of time outlining future stories, and there was one in particular that deals with Mr. Bingley and his character. Let’s take a closer look at him, shall we? Mr. Bingley is,… more goodness …

Celebrating the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride: A Tragic Character in Classic Lit Series Novel” + a Giveaway

Celebrating the Release of “Captain Stanwick’s Bride: A Tragic Character in Classic Lit Series Novel” + a Giveaway

When January 6, 2021, happened many news reporters were saying “This is the first time in history that the U.S. Capitol has been overrun!” Meanwhile, I was screaming at the TV that they were wrong. The British took control of Washington City, the name of the city before it became Washington, D. C., on August… more goodness …

Correspondence Between Men and Women in the Regency

Correspondence Between Men and Women in the Regency

Letter writing.  In our current age of phones, computers, and social media, it is quickly becoming a dying art. But for people living in the Regency, it was absolutely necessary.  Apart from speaking in person, or relying upon a verbal relay by a messenger,  it was the only way that people in that time could… more goodness …

A Painting Inspired by a Jane Austen Novel?

A Painting Inspired by a Jane Austen Novel?

About year ago, on a visit to the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, I came across a delightful painting that immediately set my imagination flying.  The 1887 painting, titled Two Strings to Her Bow, shows a cheerful young woman walking with her arms around two supposed suitors, neither of whom seem too pleased… more goodness …

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