Category Archives: History

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

Was Elizabeth Bennet a bluestocking?

In reviewing Pride & Prejudice, one thing stands out to me. Why wasn’t Elizabeth Bennet referred to, or thought of, as a bluestocking? She was, after all, an educated woman, although her education was a result of her own thirst for knowledge, and not because of any schooling, which would have been, in accordance with… more goodness …

Of Property Ownership and Inheritance

Of Property Ownership and Inheritance

This month I wanted to discuss a few things relating to property ownership and all that entails (pun intended—sort of . . .) The ownership of property was a large part of what made a Regency man a gentleman. The second aspect of attaining gentleman status was having tenants who farmed the land in the… more goodness …

The Mechanical Turk, or the Chess-Playing Machine that Beat Napoleon 

The Mechanical Turk, or the Chess-Playing Machine that Beat Napoleon 

It was the year 1809. The Napoleonic Wars were in full swing, but the French general had other interests besides fighting the British over Spain and Portugal.  Around the time Jane Austen and her mother and sister moved to Chawton and took possession of their new home, courtesy of Jane’s brother Edward, Napoleon arrived in… more goodness …

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

Priscilla Mullins, Real-Life Inspiration for the Heroine in “The Courtship of Lord Blackhurst” + a Giveaway

From Mayflower History: BIRTH:  Perhaps around 1602, likely either at Dorking or Guildford, co. Surrey, England, daughter of William Mullins. MARRIAGE:  John Alden, about 1622 or 1623, at Plymouth. CHILDREN: Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Priscilla, Jonathan, Sarah, Ruth, Mary, Rebecca, and David. DEATH:  Sometime between 1651 and 1687 at Duxbury.  By tradition she attended the funeral of Josiah Winslow in 1680,… more goodness …

Pondering Pride and Passover

Pondering Pride and Passover

Having recently finished a rough draft of my next novel, I’ve been focused on working with alpha readers and trying to revise, restructure and basically reinvent my ever-evolving storyline. All this is done in stolen moments in between a 10-hour work day and household responsibilities… laundry, grocery shopping, etc. Life seems but a quick succession… more goodness …

Neurodiversity and Mr. Darcy

Neurodiversity and Mr. Darcy

It’s April, and that means many things. It is, according to TS Eliot, “…the cruellest month, breeding / Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing / Memory and desire, stirring / Dull roots with spring rain.” Perhaps not coincidentally, it is also the month when many in North America settle in to do their taxes for the previous year.… more goodness …

Easter as a Pride and Prejudice Plot Device

Easter as a Pride and Prejudice Plot Device

Happy Easter Monday! I think today is a perfect day to talk about Easter in Jane Austen’s novel, Pride and Prejudice. Since Jane was the daughter of a rector, we can infer certain things from her use of Easter in the plot, a context that was obvious to her contemporary English readers, since she lived… more goodness …

Women’s rights in the nineteenth century

Women’s rights in the nineteenth century

If you’re anything like me, you love reading Jane Austen’s novels and find the stories of her heroines, like Elizabeth Bennet, sticking up for themselves and what they believe in highly appealing. But in creating female characters like this, Austen was actually highlighting the reality that in her era women had very few rights. Well… more goodness …

Between The Sheets

Between The Sheets

Today I’d like to talk about a subject that has drawn a lot of attention recently among fans of regency romances:   The first time I heard about the new Netflix series Bridgerton was when I saw fellow regency fans online talking about the “mature” scenes in it. Judging by the buzz created, there must be… more goodness …