Author Archives: Paisley James

The Desire to Escape into Reading

The Desire to Escape into Reading

Recently I had the pleasure of reading a great book called Anticipating Education by Dr. Deborah Britzman. The book is a collection of some of her lectures and/or talks on using psychoanalysis to reflect on pedagogy. In the book, there is a fascinating chapter about reading. Britzman talks about her early memories of reading, her struggles,… more goodness …

Love Letters

Love Letters

Hello all, Over the last several months I have been watching a Turkish TV series. Yes, I am actually watching a daily show in a completely foreign language. Why? Because love is a universal language and a good love story, in any language or culture, is relatable and enjoyable to watch. You know how I… more goodness …

Location Location Location

Location Location Location

Hello everyone, Let me begin by thanking you for all your well wishes for me and my family since the last post. I am happy to report that my husband and I have fully recovered from Covid-19. It was a rough couple of weeks, but I am fully aware of how fortunate we both are… more goodness …

“Life is a Pleasant Rite”

“Life is a Pleasant Rite”

Dear all, I hope you are all well and keeping safe. Today’s post is going to be quite different from my usual posts. Last week, my husband contracted Covid-19, and a few days later, I too began to show signs of having caught the virus. As I am sure you can imagine, the last few… more goodness …

For what do we live?

For what do we live?

  “For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?” This is one of my most loved lines from Pride and Prejudice. It pretty much sums up Jane Austen’s attitude toward life and toward her characters. She writes relatable and familiar characters and then allows… more goodness …

Marital Bliss

Marital Bliss

Austen’s novels are known for their happy endings. In all her six novels, the male and female protagonists find their “happily ever after” and become engaged. And that is precisely where the novels end and Austen never gives us a glimpse into these couples’ married lives. So, as readers we are left to imagine beautiful and… more goodness …

A Force to Reckon with

A Force to Reckon with

Of all the secondary characters in Austen’s novels, Lady Catherine is by far one of my favourites and the scene between Elizabeth and Lady Catherine, after the great lady finds out about Mr. Darcy’s proposal, is perhaps one of the most beautiful scenes in Pride and Prejudice. Their conversation, the back-and-forth between the two strong-minded,… more goodness …

Riding Habits

Riding Habits

Hello all, A while ago, I was doing a bit of research into the history and transformation of lady’s riding habits before and during the Regency period for a new story I was working on. As the name implies, riding habits are what women wore when they wanted to ride. A riding habit usually included… more goodness …

Flirting with Mr. Darcy

Flirting with Mr. Darcy

Hello all, I hope you are all well and keeping safe wherever you are. Here in Canada, we are going through the second wave of the pandemic and, unfortunately, the number of positive cases are surging. I have been staying home with my daughters since they are both enrolled in virtual schooling. It’s definitely a… more goodness …

Drawing Room Banter

Drawing Room Banter

One of my all-time favourite scenes in Pride and Prejudice is the conversation between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth about pride and vanity. “Mr. Darcy is not to be laughed at!” cried Elizabeth. “That is an uncommon advantage, and uncommon I hope it will continue, for it would be a great loss to me to have… more goodness …

Most Embarrassing Relations

Most Embarrassing Relations

Every one of Austen’s novels has at least one annoying or embarrassing character in them, but I think Elizabeth Bennet has, by far, the most embarrassing relations. Her three younger sisters are ridiculous, her mother is a disaster, and her father is, to say the least, quite useless. And then, there is the matter of… more goodness …